List of Low-Fat WFPB SOS-free Recipes

This page is a WORK IN PROGRESS. It is a bit messy here and there but can be used right away already until further improved/optimised.

Update info:

Dec 15th: Added recipes (+ ~20) + easier navigation.
Dec 6, 2016: Loaded and provided comments to wholefoodise and make SOS-free a large proportion of the recipes on the PlantPlate website.

Summary

Breakfast / Teatime
Lunch and Dinner

Salads
Salad dressings
Soups

Appetizers
Sauce,  dips and spreads
Desserts
Snacks
WFPB no-SOS Food Classification Explained

 

Breakfast / Teatime

Savoury Breakfast

Curried Chickpea and Millet Croquettes – 45 min (prep: 10 min, cooking: 30 min)
Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add slightly more of the strong-flavoured ingredients).

Sweet breakfast

Easy Overnight Oats – 5 min
Must: Use water instead of plant milk. The oats will release their own oat milk if you stir a bit.
Note: An instant version (not overnight) can me made with “shredded” rolled oats.

Cranberry Spice Granola
Must: Skip seeds if recovering cardiovascular disease. Use a date mash/blend instead of maple or date syrup. Instead of cranberries a dried fruit that is not processed nor with sugar added (dates, raisins, currants, figs, apricots etc).
Preferable: Skip nutmeg.

Baked Goods

Heads-up: Although baked good being ground are preferable as occasional treat or had in a small amount, not as a meal.

Banana & Blueberry Walnut Cake – 50 minutes (+~1h dough rising)

Scrumptious Hot Cross Buns– 3h10min total – 1 hour of work

Lunch & Dinner

3 Bean Mole –  45 minuts
Must: Mash a few sweet dried fruits instead of maple syrup, use real tomatoes and reduce water or use very-low-sodium tomato paste.
Preferable: prefer home-cooked beans to cans, prefer paprika to smoked paprika.
Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

7 Minute Soup – 10 minutes
Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Adzuki Bean Stew – 40 minutes
Must: Use real tomatoes and reduce water or use very-low-sodium concentrated tomato paste. Preferred/Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Artichoke Tapenade – 5 minutes
Must: Not use tahini if recovering cardiovascular disease. Preferred/Optional: Steam/boil artichokes instead of relying on cans.

Baked Butternut and Mushroom Risotto – 1h10min
Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients). Preferred: Nutritional yeast is best left out (free glutamic acid is MSG-like).

Biryani – 1h20min
This recipe is plant-perfect as it is.

Braised Leeks and Peas – 25 minutes
Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients). Preferred: Nutritional yeast is best left out (free glutamic acid may act like MSG). Instead of the commercial plant-milk, blend your own oats to make a thin whole-food milk if recovering heart disease, or almonds otherwise.

Buckwheat and Roasted Vegetable Medley – 25 minutes
Must: Not use sunflower seeds if recovering a cardiovascular disease. Mash a few sweet dried fruits instead of maple/date syrup. Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Buckwheat, Pea and Mushroom Pilaf – 40 minutes
Must: Make sure the curry powder is salt-free. Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Cauliflower Dal – 50 minutes
Preferred: Cut your own fresh whole tomatoes instead of relying on cans. Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Youcef’s Moroccan Sweet & Savoury Tagine– 2 hours – 8~10 meals (prep: 1 h – cooking 1 h)

Khadija’s Moroccan Couscous – 1 h 20 – 7 meals (prep: 20 min – cooking: 1 h)

Khadija’s Moroccan Lentils – 1 h 20 – 4 meals (prep:20 min – cooking 1 h)

Pizza:

Burgers & Sandwiches:

Easy Oven Fries
Preferred: Use regular paprika instead of paprika. Use the dips listed in the present article.

Eggplant Stuffed with Moroccan-Spiced Millet – 1h (p:10 + c:50)
Must: Use a salt-free vegetable stock, or water in which case you might want to add just a bit more of your favourite strong-flavoured ingredients in the recipe.

Healthy Hummus – 10 minutes
Must: Skip tahini if you are recovering from cardiovascular disease. Skip soy yogurt as an alternative. If using paprika, use regular paprika instead of smoked paprika.
Preferable: Prefer home-cooked beans to cans even if they’re salt-free.

Salads

Carrot, Beet and Chickpea Salad – 15 minutes
Preferred: Prefer home-cooked beans to cans even if they’re salt-free.

Balsamic-Roasted Butternut and Chickpea Salad – 30 minutes
Preferred: Prefer home-cooked beans to cans even if they’re salt-free.

Hearty Bean Salad – 10 minutes
Must: Not use avocado seeds if recovering a cardiovascular disease. Seed out and blend the lemon/lime instead of juicing them. Not use salt.
Preferred
: Prefer home-cooked beans to cans even if they’re salt-free.

Millet and Black Bean Salad– 40 minutes
Must: Replace the rice/maple syrup by mashed/blended sweet dried fruit.
Preferred: Prefer home-cooked beans to cans even if they’re salt-free.

Spring Herb Potato Salad – 40 minutes
Must: Not use mustard if recovering cardiovascular disease. Replace silken tofu by a whole food, like this mayo-ish dressing. Use seeded out and blended lemon instead of juice. Use a paste of sweet dried fruit instead of rice syrup and instead any other sweetener.

Vietnamese Vermicelli Salad – 25 minutes
Must: Not use sesame seeds if with or recovering advanced cardiovascular disease (high-fat). Not use white vermicelli if you don’t find brown rice vermicelli. Not use tamari nor soy sauce (high-salt). Use a paste/blend of sweet dried fruit instead of rice syrup and instead any other sweetener (whole food). Blend seeded lime flesh instead of juicing it (whole food).

Salad dressings

Orange-Balsamic Vinaigrette – 25 minutes
Must: Seed out and blend the oranges instead of juicing them.

Mayo/Aioli-like Dressing – 45 minutes

Soups

Carrot, Orange and Ginger Soup – 55 minutes
Must: not use miso (high-salt), blend the orange instead of juicing it. Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Creamy Zucchini Pasta – 30 minutes
Must: Not use sunflower butter or sesame seeds if with or recovering advanced cardiovascular disease (high-fat), a lower-fat creamy effect can be obtained with the nut-free version of this sauce.
Preferable: to replace plant milk by water especially using the creamy sauce suggested above. Nutritional yeast is best not used (free glutamic acid is MSG-like). Optional: Veggie stock optional (you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients).

Chinese Vegetable and Noodle Soup – 30 minutes
Must: Not use anything else than brown rice vermicelli.

Curried Pumpkin and Kale Soup – 45 min (p:15 + c:25)
Must: Use a no-sodium vegetable stock, you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients.

Curried Sweet Potato & Ginger Soup – 55 min (p:20 + c:35)
Must: Skip miso. Use a no-sodium vegetable stock, you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients.

Curried Pumpkin and Kale Soup – 40 min (p:15 + c:25)
Must: Use a no-sodium vegetable stock, you can use water instead and add more strong-flavoured ingredients.
Preferable: Skip nutmeg.

Appetizers

 

Sauces & Dips

Ketchup – 5 minutes
Must: Use a paste/blend of sweet dried fruit instead of rice syrup and instead of any other sweetener (whole food). Use no salt.

Low-fat Mayo-like, Aioli-like dips – 5 min prep – 30 min cooking

Lemon Mustard Dressing – 5 minutes
Must: Not use sesame seeds if recovering with or recovering advanced cardiovascular disease (high-fat). Use a paste/blend of sweet dried fruit instead of rice syrup and instead any other sweetener (whole food).

Chunky Salsa Dip – 25 minutes
Must: Replace the maple/date syrup by mashed/blended sweet dried fruit. Use a salt-free or very low-salt tomato paste, or make your own and reduce it.
Preferred: Use paprika instead of smoked paprika. Prefer home-cooked foods to cans even if they’re salt-free.

Tomato and Pepper Chutney – 35 minutes
Must: Use a paste/blend of sweet dried fruit instead of maple syrup and instead any other sweetener (whole food)

Spreads

Savoury

Moroccan-style Jackfruit Tuna with Spicy Tomato Sauce – 1h
This recipe is potentially plant-perfect. Directions to make WFPB SOS-free in the recipe article.

Sweet

Orange Marmalade – 10 min prep / 3 h cooking

Black Lemon Marmalade – 5 min  prep – 2 h cooking

Desserts

Fresh Fruits.

Nice Cream – 5 minuts
Must: Use water instead of plant milk if needed at all, use real vanilla bean instead of an extracts.

WFPB SOS-free Food Classification

Why is there confusion with what is a “true” whole food?
Why best practice is where I stand?
List of acceptable/non-acceptable low-fat whole foods and exceptions

Why is there confusion with what is a “true” whole food?

There are various degrees of how seriously one can implement a WFPB no-SOS diet. The somewhat subjective word is “whole food” because “processing” a food can mean a lot of thing although we have some good idea what the safest definitions are.

Since whole foods are meant for health, the mother question remains “How likely is that likely is ingredient X or recipe X to be harmful?” or “How likely am I or the people in my house to abuse the wrong products supposed to be had in moderation”.

It’s easier (and sadly more popular) to adopt a loose approach with WFPB, and sadly so many cookbooks do so. I reckon these are of major help and far better than nothing, and I understand that some compromises might appeal more to the general public as a step. In the whole-food and plant-based circles,  we get irritated by the stories/articles of doctors who know eating a plant-based diet would be the best thing for a patient, but they don’t tell them assuming the patient will accept. We all agree, tell the patient, if you the doctor don’t eat this way, and let the patient decide.
Well, likewise, our whole food leaders should not shy away from proposing the best practice, and they know what it is. Whether they practice it or not personally at home, people need to be told and shown best practice and decide for themselves where they want to compromise their health and nutrition, if they want to compromise it at all.

So where do I stand?

My approach is pretty simple:

  1. If what I have on my kitchen counter to start with doesn’t look like the solid foods I would bring back from a garden/field somewhere, it’s probably not a food.
  2. If what ends in my mouth, has lost something in the journey since it was an edible food from the garden, I’ve probably done something I shouldn’t do.
  3. If a beverage isn’t what falls from the clouds and fills the lakes and rivers and ponds all other animals drink from, or that mixed with item #1, it’s probably not a beverage.

Does this sound like common sense ? Yes. Is this is what the healthiest populations we know of actually did? Yes.

In this modern, outsourced, processed world, I am not the type of person that will  recognise something processed (or artificial) as safe by default, and say “there’s no strong enough proof it’s harmful” until the (predictable) day there is. Looking in the past and learn from cumulative personal and collective wisdom, you’ve got to think ahead and not reinvent the square wheel.

This said I’m very aware that if we go 500 years ahead or use an omniscient computer, and look back at the way I eat, in hindsight there are certainly things I exclude which may be irrelevant health-wise. Is it a big deal? No. Why?

For one, I’m already very satisfied eating the way we already eat, real food for really healthy humans.
If logic strongly suggests that something both unnecessary and unnatural, is going to be likely harmful by definition, then I find it not just wiser but also easier to not do any amount of that.
It saves me the self-inflicted torture of “moderation”.
It saves me the harm left behind by of half-measures.
It saves me the million wonders, doubts and guilts when a health problem arises.
It saves me the unspeakable waste of time there is keeping in touch with the fine science of measuring just how harmful are exactly the utterly unnecessary harmful things humans still decide to do or eat.

Alright! We got it…Now shoot the list!

Non-foods:

  • artificial flavourings (vanilla extracts, etc)
  • artificial leavening agents (baking soda, baking powders, etc)
  • salt
  • liquid smoke (smoke in liquid form, hundreds of toxic chemicals, including aromatic hydrocarbons, many of which are known carcinogens).

Common processed foods:

  • tofu in all its forms
  • extracted sugars such as: date syrup, date sugar, rice syrup, coconut sugar, rice syrup, molasses…they may not be empty calories, but a sugar extracted from its natural and usually fiber-rich environnement (tree trunk, coconut stalk, beet root, corn kernel, rice grain…) is not a whole food and should be viewed by default as something inherently very similar to white or refined sugar. What is a whole food is a whole dried fruit for instance.
  • nutritional yeast: Principle of precaution: The glutamic acid is released when the nutritional yeast is deactivated by a heat process, an umami taste appears and that’s due to the same molecule as that in Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), which has been proven harmful).

Tolerated are:

  • Cocoa powder: it is the fibre-rich, lower-fat fraction of the whole cocoa fruit. Not a whole food, best kept to a minimum if had at all (mainly due to the fat), a million times preferable to chocolate which is pure fat and sugar.
  • Vinegars: The whole-food version would be rather unappetising and vinegar has shown some health benefits.
  • Plant milks: They are refined products. Their popularity, omnipresence and liquid aspect makes us forget it’s a highly processed food, not uncommonly comprised of many processed ingredients with relevant amounts of sugar and/or fat. I prefer doing without, and looking for ways to replace them whenever possible.
  • Low-salt or salt-free tomato pastes.

Low-fat Mayo, Aioli and Dips – Oil-free, Whole foods, Vegan

Traditionally mayos and aiolis rely heavily on loads of fat and animal protein.
A double punishment right from the start, only made worse by the fact that these dips serve to lubricate typically deep-fried “foods” like fries and wedges, a guaranteed stroke served on a golden platter.

Well…Good News! The experience of hot delicious, potato wedges dipped much generously in a delicious creamy aioli can be enjoyed not just in its vegan version, but also with hardly any fat at all – whether from oil, or from nuts!

GREEN BANANA AIOLI_610
So what’s the secret? Blend cooked starches! and I’ve been on a quest for good candidates in unexpected places!

Green bananas (as in unripe regular banana) are amazing bases for so many things. I used them for Ghanaian dishes as a plantain substitute for Kelewele and in Red-Red.
They’re quite bland, mildly sweet. Be reassured right away, they do not taste like banana at all. That’s precisely why they’re amazing. Both taste and texture are amazingly versatile.

This time around, I blended them, with a bit of roasted garlic flakes, some apple cider vinegar and a small amount of (optional) cashew nuts. Amazing low-fat aioli!

Make a good round of delicious, oil-free, nicely seasoned, potato wedges and enjoy!

Low-Fat Aioli – Oil-free, Whole Foods, Vegan
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
LOW-FAT AIOLI, makes 1 half-cup ++, enough for two people to dip a large round of parboiled+oven-baked, oil-free, potato wedges!
Author:
Recipe type: low-fat, whole-food plant nutrition, vegan, oil-free, sugar-free, salt-free
Cuisine: Western
Serves: 1 half-cup, enough for 2 people on potato wedges.
Ingredients
  • 1 green banana (not yellow!), cooked "Samoan-style" that is boiled whole (in its skin) for 30 minutes, drained, cooled, and peeled. Batch boil in a big pot to use for other things.
  • 1~2 tbsp dehydrated garlic flakes (not the fried ones), dry-roasted in a pan on low until golden/brown.
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar or lime/lemon juice ( or better with its flesh, not peel, lime peel is super bitter!)
  • Just enough water to blend.
  • Optional: 1 tbsp cashew nuts (7g), soaked. Must be skipped if you're recovering from any cardiovascular disease.
Instructions
  1. Blend
  2. Indulge
Notes
Play around with other flavours to make other exciting dips, mayos, bechamel sauces, etc: onion flakes, mustard seeds, chilli, lemon peel, etc...whatever health-promoting food makes your taste buds happy 🙂 Let loose the wild creative animal that you are!